Our Prize winners in the News

ERIKA DeFREITAS
Almost, always, at once:
a suite of new embroidered works

Angell Gallery
1444 Dupont St., Building B, Unit 15

Painted in 1882, Yellow Roses in a Vase is a still life by Gustave Caillebotte that depicts a lush impression of a vase of roses in full bloom, set on a marbled tabletop against a dark background. Held in the collection of the Dallas Museum of Art, it was included in the 2014 exhibition Bouquets: French Still-Life Painting from Chardin to Matisse. Toronto-based Erika DeFreitas, (Artist prize finalist in 2016) who happened to be in Dallas showing in a group exhibition at the time, says that the exhibition left a lasting impression on her, but not just because the paintings were beautiful. What struck DeFreitas was how many of the paintings, including the Caillebotte, pictured petals that had dropped from the flowers. “They were constant reminders that flowers, like us, live and die,” she says. “Everything is subject to a life cycle and the passage of time.”

Runs November 10 – December 1, 2018

angellgallery.com

__________________________________________________________________

Online book publisher Art Canada Institute: The Canadian Online Art Book Project (Project Support recipient 2015)  has released two new online books:

 


Homer Watson: Life & Work
is a fascinating study of a painter who defined what his art and identity meant, forty years before the Group of Seven. Author Brian Foss traces the artist from the romanticism and naturalism of Watson’s first canvases to the increasingly expressionistic imagery of his later years.

Molly Lamb Bobak: Life & Work traces the career of this pioneering Canadian and the diverse range of her artistic output, from her still lifes and interiors to her crowd scenes and self-portraits. Illuminating the unique way in which she challenged the constraints of gender bias through her work, the book explores Bobak’s legacy as an artist and educator. Author Michelle Gewurtz writes “Molly Lamb Bobak’s career as a professional artist began as Canada’s first official woman war artist. She remains best known for the paintings she produced once the hostilities ended in Europe and for the humorous, satirical drawings she included in her wartime diary—often with subtle critiques of gender.”

Art Canada Institute: The Canadian Online Art Book Project

Recent Articles

Michèle Pearson Clarke appointed Photo Laureate of Toronto

Posted Jun 5th, 2019 • 1 min read
Much to our pleasure and satisfaction, the same day the Toronto Friends of the Visual Arts recognized Michèle Pearson Clarke as an [...]

View Article

Board of Directors 2019/20

Posted Jun 4th, 2019 • 1 min read
Our Annual General Meeting was held on June 3, 2019 at The Toronto Hunt, and a new slate of directors was approved. [...]

View Article

TFVA Prize Winners 2019

Posted Jun 4th, 2019 • 2 min read
TFVA is an independent, non-profit organization which provides an educational program for its members and gives financial support to the visual arts [...]

View Article